Fishing Overview

Fishing is best here from late March through the end of November. Winter time trips run December through March. 

photo Peter Lawson-Johnston

photo Peter Lawson-Johnston

Skiff

Our 1999 Maverick Master Angler 17' is a great skiff for targeting redfish on fly. It is a wider and heavier skiff than the new models of today, but it allows for a comfortable ride, stability in chop and most importantly, safety. It accommodates up to 3 passengers if necessary and drafts only a foot and a half of water. It also offers a spacious deck, casting area, and storage. For full day trips, a full tank of gas can lead you to over 100 miles of lowcountry marsh and fly fishing adventure.

photo Peter Lawson-Johnston

photo Peter Lawson-Johnston

Flood Tides

From about April through the end of October, each month we experience a set of higher tides associated with the moon phase. When the tide rises and floods the spartina flats, hungry redfish anywhere from 15" up to 35"+ can be found scouring the mud for crabs and baitfish. They tip their tails above the water line as they dig in the mud looking for their prey. It is one of the most beautiful displays of feeding fish and is the most opportune time to delicately present your fly. What ensues next, you'll just need to see for yourself. 

photo Peter Lawson-Johnston

photo Peter Lawson-Johnston

Low Tides

Low tide in the lowcountry can also offer exciting and energetic redfish action. Mainly taking place in creeks and around oyster beds, redfish can school up in some tight places and are often found making large wakes after their food. Shrimp and baitfish will bust out of the way, blue crabs get gobbled up on the sides of mud banks, and the angler on the bow will get many shots in on the action. 

The in between

We also target an array of other species here in the lowcountry. Speckled sea trout are often fun on the top water bite, along with summertime sight fishing for sharks. Bonnetheads and Black Tips are among the top shark species and are found at low tide cruising oyster banks. Every now and then you will run into tailing sheepshead in the grass, as well as the odd black drum. There are opportunities to look for tarpon at certain times of the year, as well as false albacore, bluefish, and big bull redfish.


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